June 15

Song of Solomon 1-4, Psalm 11

Saint Augustine said, “To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek Him the greatest adventure; to find Him, the greatest human achievement.”  There are a few different ways to view the Book, Song of Solomon.  On the surface, it is a picture of the love and romance between a husband and wife.  So vivid are the words in this book that the Jewish people at one time would not allow their sons to read it until they were 30 years old.  This book can also be read as an allegory describing God’s love for Israel.  Lastly, in a way that gives this book a very deep purpose, we can read the words as an allegory revealing the love that Christ has for His church, the bride of Christ.  That there are many different ways to view this Scripture should not be surprising, since there are multiple portions of Scripture which can be viewed from different positions.  In Revelation chapters 2-3, concerning Jesus’ letters to the 7 churches, they have direct application to specific churches at that time, application to movements in church history as well as personal application in the lives of believers.  As we read the prophets, much of what they say has both fulfillment both in near and future events. 

When we read this book as being a picture of Christ’s love for us, His bride, we can never take His love for granted ever again.  In fact the Song of Solomon was the favorite book of both D. L. Moody and Charles Spurgeon.  When we read in chapter 3:1-2, we get a sense of just how fervently we should seek after our Lord, “By night on my bed I sought the one I love; I sought him, but I did not find him. ” I will rise now,” I said, “And go about the city; In the streets and in the squares I will seek the one I love.”.  In Matthew 7:7, when it says, “…seek, and you will find;” the word is really an action word which means to continuously seek or to keep on seeking.  He will never play hide and seek with us.  If we seek Him with all of our heart, we will indeed find Him.  Our role, as the bride in this story, is to deeply desire Him above all else.

We read in Song of Solomon, 4:7, “You are fair, my love, And there is no spot in you.”  It is so easy to think or question whether God could really still love us when we stumble and sin.  The amazing thing about God’s love is that it is unconditional, “agape” love.  He loves us completely despite our sins.  In fact, nothing that we can do could make Him love us any more than He already does.  Once we belong to Him as His bride, nothing that we do destroys His love and affection towards us.  Paul gives us a picture of this in Ephesians 5:25-27, “Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her, that He might sanctify and cleanse her with the washing of water by the word, that He might present her to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she should be holy and without blemish.”  Once we repent and accept His sacrifice and make Him Lord of our lives, we stand spotless before His throne.  “For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

Messages from Pastor Lloyd Pulley:

Aaron Salvato